Maki Mori
Maki Mori, Soprano
Grand Prize

Maki Mori received degrees in voice from the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, the Conservatorio di musica Giuseppe Verdi in Milan and the master’s course of the Hochschule für Musik in Munich.

Maki Mori received degrees in voice from the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, the Conservatorio di musica Giuseppe Verdi in Milan and the master’s course of the Hochschule für Musik in Munich.

Winner of numerous competitions including Plácido Domingo’s Operalia Competition (Hamburg) and International Singing Competiton Orfeo 2000 (Hannover), Ms. Mori is also the recipient of many special prizes for Lied and Bach-interpretation. She has appeared in numerous recitals and concerts in Germany, Italy, Austria, Hungary and Japan, performing works of Purcell, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Bellini, Donizetti, Fauré, Mahler, Orff, R. Strauss and J. Strauss. And as soloist of the Mito Chamber Orchestra, she recorded Exsultate jubilate with Seiji Ozawa, to be released in the near future.

Ms. Mori has performed at the Washington Opera as Blonde in Die Entfürung aus dem Serail, as Gilda in Rigoletto, as Blumen Mädchen with Plácido Domingo in Parsifal, and as Olympia in Les Contes d’ Hoffmann, and recently sang the role of Adele in the Washington Opera’s 2003 season presentation of Die Fledermaus.

On May 23, 2003, S&R Foundation sponsored Md. Mori’s New York debut concert at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall. A reception was held at The Nippon Club. Liaisons between S&R Foundation and several organizations were created to facilitate the advancement of the goals of the Foundation, and interest in Ms. Mori’s career. Discussions that will hopefully result in a contractual relationship took place between Ms. Mori, the Foundation, and the Warner & Columbia Music companies. Additionally, Ms. Mori’s CD’s were sold as a fundraising effort for the Foundation.

S&R and Ms. Mori have agreed to produce a professional CD recording of this concert at Carnegie Hall, providing the enjoyment of her gifted voice to a worldwide audience, and advancing the Foundation’s charitable objectives to encourage and stimulate scientific research and artistic endeavor. The CD’s inside jacket will be reserved for listing the names of those persons, or companies, whose generosity assisted the S&R Foundation in making this production possible. The net proceeds from the sale of the CD will be used by the Foundation to advance its charitable purposes.

Maiko Chiba
Maiko Chiba, Composer

Born in Tokyo, Maiko Chiba received her Bachelor’s degree in music composition from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. At the university, she was granted the Ataka award, which is given to students who have the highest academic achievements. Ms. Chiba received her Master’s Degree in composition from the University of Maryland’s School of Music and is currently studying in the doctoral program in composition at the same school. She has studied composition and harmony with Sakurako Ota, Akira Kitamura, Jo Kondo, Jeffrey Mumford, Robert Gibson and Thomas DeLio. Ms.

Born in Tokyo, Maiko Chiba received her Bachelor’s degree in music composition from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. At the university, she was granted the Ataka award, which is given to students who have the highest academic achievements. Ms. Chiba received her Master’s Degree in composition from the University of Maryland’s School of Music and is currently studying in the doctoral program in composition at the same school. She has studied composition and harmony with Sakurako Ota, Akira Kitamura, Jo Kondo, Jeffrey Mumford, Robert Gibson and Thomas DeLio. Ms. Chiba received a first prize in the University of Maryland’s Walsum Competition (2002), was a regional winner in the SCI/ASCAP Student Competition (2000 and 2003), received a Special Commendation from the Vienna Modern Masters Orchestral Recording Award (Austria, 1997), and won a third prize from the Suita Music Competition (Osaka, 1990).

Her Piano trio “On a Field of Wintry Glass,” which was commissioned and premiered in 2000 by the Opus 3 Trio, was highly praised by the Washington Post, “’On a Field of Wintry Glass’…. Revealed a composer with an ear for delicate textures and carefully calibrate sonorities.”

Ms. Chiba’s field of composition also extends to stage, commercial video and film music – she has worked with Sucampo Pharmaceutical Inc. and R-Tech Ueno for their company’s commercial videos, collaborated with Shizumi Dance Theater for “First Lady’s Luncheon” as a part of the National Cherry Blossom Festival in 2003, and worked with NHK (Japan Broadcasting Co.) for numerous documentary programs, including “Wild Clay, Ancient Fire ~Willi Singeleton and his pottery~” (broadcast in 2002 in the USA), “Hi-Vision Documentary Special: The Political Refugees” (broadcast in 2001 in Japan) and “NHK Special: 9.11 —The truth after a year—” (broadcast in 2002 in Japan). One of her musical piece for a NHK documentary program received the NHK HDTV Award (Tokyo, 2001) and a Washington Award by the S&R foundation (Washington, DC, 2001). Her most recent work “Requiem for mezzo soprano and Orchestra (2003)” will be used in a documentary film by NHK, and the program will be broadcast in the USA in this year.

Ms. Chiba is a member of American Composers Forum, Society of Composers, Inc. and BMI.

Keico Wantanabe
Keico Watanabe, Painter

Keico Watanabe was awarded for her oil painting titled “L’ Attitude 40*” in which a comical fellow walks a tight rope between city skyscrapers. Her painting crosses humor with a rueful depiction of the nature of human beings.

She holds many solo exhibitions in Tokyo and New York. Ms. Watanabe loves New York City where she can live and express naturally. The energy of the city allows her to create her unique style of painting, which brings a gentle smile as well as serious thoughts about human nature. Ms. Watanabe believes that healthy mind and body are the basis of her art.

Keico Watanabe was awarded for her oil painting titled “L’ Attitude 40*” in which a comical fellow walks a tight rope between city skyscrapers. Her painting crosses humor with a rueful depiction of the nature of human beings.

She holds many solo exhibitions in Tokyo and New York. Ms. Watanabe loves New York City where she can live and express naturally. The energy of the city allows her to create her unique style of painting, which brings a gentle smile as well as serious thoughts about human nature. Ms. Watanabe believes that healthy mind and body are the basis of her art.

Willi Singleton
Willi Singleton, Ceramic Art

Willi Singleton was awarded for his outstanding pottery art using traditional Japanese techniques in eastern Pennsylvania. Using natural materials located in his neighborhood, he throws his pots with a Japanese kickwheel and fires them in a woodfired climbing kiln. There is a subtle and deep beauty in his works created by a wonderful encounter of American nature and Japanese tradition.

“Making pots is like planting seeds. I am trying to grow pots from the materials the Earth provides, using the transforming forces of Nature to nurture them into being. ”

- Willi Singleton

Willi Singleton was awarded for his outstanding pottery art using traditional Japanese techniques in eastern Pennsylvania. Using natural materials located in his neighborhood, he throws his pots with a Japanese kickwheel and fires them in a woodfired climbing kiln. There is a subtle and deep beauty in his works created by a wonderful encounter of American nature and Japanese tradition.

“Making pots is like planting seeds. I am trying to grow pots from the materials the Earth provides, using the transforming forces of Nature to nurture them into being. ”

- Willi Singleton

I was introduced to high temperature woodfiring during an apprenticeship in Tamba, Japan in 1982. The simplicity and power of the Tamba woodfired climbing kilns awed me. From that point on I have focused on firing with wood. After I left Tamba, I traveled extensively within Japan investigating possibilities of further study. I found an amazing variety within Japanese woodfired ceramics. I was eventually drawn to Mashiko where I learned how to throw on the kickwheel and participated in kiln building projects. After two years in Mashiko I returned to the United States in 1987, to establish a pottery on family land in eastern Pennsylvania and built a four chamber climbing kiln. I have been working here by myself since 1990, but occasionally get some assistance from my partner, Celia, and the many friends that arrive to help me fire the kiln, three times a year.

The newly rebuilt kiln and I have now survived thirty two firings. My pots are mostly kickwheel thrown and fully grazed. I make my glazes mostly from materials coming from the surrounding area- creek clay, wood ash, corn stalk ash and rice hull ash. I also use feldspar, kaolin and two oxides from the ceramic supply house. My pots are made with a mixture of an industrially mined clay body with a local clay from the top of Hawk Mountain, just up the road from my pottery. For large jars and large bowls, I use just the industrially mined clay body. For some other pots, especially for tea ceremony, I use just the Hawk Mt. clay. I don’t consider myself a “purist”(i.e. restricting myself solely to local materials) but I find it interesting and workable to use primarily locally obtained materials. Making pots is like cooking. You have to start with good ingredients to get a flavorful, satisfying result. By using local clays and various ashes I am trying to make pots which have a pleasing favor. Using a wood flame to fire these pots enhances the character of these materials. Although there are not many obvious ash deposits on my pots, the variety of colors and textures in them are largely due to the wood flame interacting with the clay and glaze materials, just as food cooked over an open fire carries a taste of the flame and smoke.

Working with natural materials and with the unpredictability of firing in a 400 cubic foot wood kiln, I am always surprised when I open the kiln. Although the potter has a lot of control over the processes leading up to the firing, the kiln ultimately decides how each piece will be transformed. My glazes have a very narrow range of successful firing. For some glazes, the window of success is only about 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Other glazes are more forgiving. By mixing mostly ashes of differing silica content with some feldspar and local clay, I’ve come up with some pretty difficult glazes. The potential for either under firing or glaze, running is quite high, but I prefer to loose some pots (occasionally 50%), rather than accept stable glazes with less interesting results.

Although woodfiring potters are viewed by some as anachronistic masochists, I believe woodfiring becomes increasingly relevant in this age of incredible technological advances. The growing popularity of woodfiring shows the seductive allure of this labor intensive approach. In contrast to anagama firing, many of my pots don’t appear to have been woodfired at all, but upon close inspection, they are each altered somehow by their encounter with the fire, the unidirectional flame, the slight flashing due to ash deposits, and the always fluctuating kiln atmosphere, makes different things happen, compared with other types of firing. It won’t turn a bad pot into a good pot, but there’s a chance that it will turn a good pot into a great pot. By using a wood flame and natural clays and ashes, I believe there is a possibility of attaining a deeper and more subtle beauty.hiko I returned to the United States in 1987, to establish a pottery on family land in eastern Pennsylvania and built a four chamber climbing kiln. I have been working here by myself since 1990, but occasionally get some assistance from my partner, Celia, and the many friends that arrive to help me fire the kiln, three times a year. The newly rebuilt kiln and I have now survived thirty two firings.